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central market cbd

Central market cbd

Director of SOMCAN, April Veneracion, explained the action network is committed to defining what “community benefits” should mean for their neighborhood. The community leaders of SoMa are “coming together to form a platform around affordable housing, job protection, beautification, pedestrian safety, and the preservation of cultural institutions”. Though discussion has taken place, Veneracion asserted the two sides are yet to engage in a substantive dialogue.

On the eve of a month long recess, the Board of Supervisors moved to postpone consideration of the Central Market Community Benefit Districts (CBD) until September 12th. Supervisor Daly expressed his sincere gratitude to the Mayor’s Office of Economic and Work Force Development and the Market Street Association for their unwavering cooperation in settling the issue. But despite a “flurry of meetings” leading up to Tuesday’s board meeting, more discussion is required to reconcile the requests of community stakeholders and the organization putting together the plans for the CBD, the Central Market Steering Committee.

The Central Market CBD began discussions with community groups late in the game, risking cooperation with the all too often ignored leaders of the district. Fortunately, it was better they began talks late than never. Though Veneracion acknowledged conversations are just in their “beginning stages”, she expressed a firm commitment to working with the Steering Committee to create a truly innovative piece of legislation.

With those interests in mind, SOMCAN has taken a very critical stance towards development in the mid-Market area. The group wants assurances that owners do not pass the costs of the CBD tax on to low-income residents and small businesses.

The South of Market Community Action Network (SOMCAN) argues the push for increased police presence veers from the true intent of the CBD. And furthermore, that their district suffers primarily from basic quality of life issues a suffocating police presence will not fix.

To propose an election to determine if the tax will be levied, 30% of community stakeholders must express their interest in the tax. After assessment, revision, and passage by the board, the resolution is then voted on in the district and settled by a majority vote.

Historically, SoMa has lacked a political forum encouraging citizens of all classes to weigh in on community-wide decisions. But SOMCAN is working to reverse this trend. The organization pioneered the Platform for Community Stabilization last year and in doing so asserted its right to evaluate new area plans and development projects based on the “existing assets and needs” of the community. Shockingly, their definition of needs extends to the low-income, non-property owning residents of the neighborhood, a constituency long ignored.

The City to Bay Tram stops right on our doorstep in Victoria Square/Tarndanyangga. Or you could catch any city bound public transport, with a short walk to the Market.

Address: 44-60 Gouger St Adelaide SA 5000

The FREE City Connector bus has hop-on and hop-off stops located on Grote Street. It’s a quick and easy way of getting around with the service running on a regular basis linking the Market to City and North Adelaide destinations. For more information visit https://www.adelaidemetro.com.au/Timetables-Maps/Special-Services/Free-City-Services or Adelaide Metro to find out bus and train routes and timetables.

If you are driving to the Market, then parking is easy with over 1,000 undercover parking spaces available in the Central Market UPark, located directly above the Market and is easily accessible from both Gouger and Grote Street, with first hour free parking during Market hours (T&C’s apply).

Central market cbd

Hours
Tue | Thu – 7am-2pm
Sat – 6am-2pm

Market shoppers enjoy the finest in locally grown flowers and produce, baked goods, fresh seafood, meats, deli products and many specialty items while sellers network and hawk their wares in a bustling, supportive environment. Locals and visitors alike find fresh local flavor at the many prepared food vendors, with tons of seating for mingling and making the rounds.

Standing at North Beaver and Philadelphia Streets for over 125 years, Central Market is a reminder of York’s storied history and the anchor of the revitalization of Downtown York. More than just a beautiful historic building, Central Market is both a grassroots commercial operation and a community gathering place. It is the economic and social heart of the city.

Yorkers know that a “Market Day” means grabbing coffee with a friend and fresh vegetables to take home for dinner. It means listening to live music while browsing unique artisan crafts. On a Market Day, we catch a cooking demonstration and catch up on local news. We lunch on soup, sandwiches and salads, and grab something sweet to take back to the office. A Market Day means a day for socializing and supporting local. It’s a day to be a part of what’s going on downtown.

Market Day

Come see why Central Market “belongs” to every member of our community. It’s our market; our heart. We think it will soon be your market too.

Standing at North Beaver and Philadelphia Streets for over 125 years, Central Market is a reminder of York’s storied history and the anchor of the revitalization of Downtown York. More than just a beautiful historic building, Central Market is both a grassroots commercial operation and a community gathering place. It is the economic and social heart of the city.

First Fridays
5pm-9pm
Vendor Hours May Vary